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Gender study finds 90% of people are biased against women

A new UN report has found at least 90% of men and women hold some sort of bias against females. The “Gender Social Norms” index analyzed biases in areas such as politics and education in 75 countries. There are no countries in the world with gender equality, the study found.

Pedro Conceição, head of UNDP’s Human Development Report Office said: “We have come a long way in recent decades to ensure that women have the same access to life’s basic needs as men. But gender gaps are still all too obvious in other areas, particularly those that challenge power relations and are most influential in actually achieving true equality. Today. the fight about gender equality is a story of bias and prejudices.”

  • Globally, close to 50% of men said they had more right to a job than women. Almost a third of respondents thought it was acceptable for men to hit their partners.
  • Zimbabwe had the highest amount of bias with only 0.27% of people reporting no gender bias at all. At the other end of the scale was Andorra where 72% of people reported no bias.
  • In Zimbabwe, 96% of people expressed a bias against women’s physical integrity – a measure covering support for violence against women and opposition to reproductive rights. In the Philippines, 91% of people held views that were detrimental to women’s physical integrity.
  • According to the report, about half of the world’s men and women feel that men make better political leaders.
  • In China, 55% of people thought men were better suited to be political leaders.
  • Around 39% of people in the US, which is yet to have a female president, thought men made better leaders. Globally, 40% of people thought men made better business executives. In the UK, 25% of people thought men should have more right to a job than women and said men made better business executives than women did. In India, that figure was 69%.

Share of seats in parliament held by women

Region Percentage
Arab States 18.3
East Asia & Pacific 20.3
Europe & Central Asia 21.2
Latin America & the Caribbean 31
South Asia 17.1
Sub-Saharan Africa 23.5
Source: United Nations Development Programme

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We are behavior machines. Observed from inside, our lives are oceanic and operatic, the deepest story we can know. Movies run their characters through mad plots just to tell us a story of intensity comparable to our inner lives. Opera makes extreme music that translates emotionally to the weight of a normal life being lived. Our lives are magic bags, bigger inside than out.

As individuals, we arrive here loaded like treasure galleons with personality, attitude and latent loves and hates. As babies, we appear to people in general as simple to the point of near homogeneity, merely the site of a future human being. But our parents can see a coherent unfolding narrative in the styles and passions we show as we grow. We develop through our own efforts, a bit, but not nearly as much as we reveal ourselves. We are part of the audience for our own reveal as we learn unexpected truths from growing. Our personal executive-style emerges from this dense core of individuality and we advance,  leaving a culminating trail of decisions like footprints in the snow. So our trajectory becomes clear. Continue reading

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I didn’t write this, I lived it. All I would add is that for most of these, the word ‘child’ could just as well be; friend, sibling, partner, employee. Credit to the anonymous author.

 

  1. I’m trying way harder than you’ll ever know even though it doesn’t seem like it to you. I really, truly am.
  2. Criticizing me or getting angry at me that my brain doesn’t work better doesn’t help me. It makes me hate myself even more.
  3. I’m painfully aware of all the areas that I’m not measuring up. Instead of making a big deal about my shortcomings, try to find ways to help me.
  4. An accommodation isn’t the same as enabling. If you help me where I’m genuinely struggling, I’m going to be grateful. Don’t assume that I’m manipulating you.
  5. I’m not doing this to you, it’s NOT something I am doing on purpose.
  6. If you think it’s hard to live with me, imagine trying to live inside a body that won’t do what you want it to do.
  7. My brain doesn’t work right but I don’t know how to tell you that. It makes me angry and unkind, but I’m not trying to be that way.
  8. When I’m being horrible, what I really need is for you to tell me you’ll love me no matter what. And maybe hug me, too. I probably believe that I’m unlovable, so prove me wrong.
  9. I know that my lack of motivation is frustrating, but pushing harder doesn’t help me do better.
  10. My anger and frustration is a result of my brain not processing properly. When I’m overwhelmed and freaking out, don’t escalate by freaking out or getting angry too. I need you to be calm and show me that everything’s going to be fine even when I feel like it’s not.
  11. If I get overwhelmed, don’t expect me to sort out the problem all by myself. The part of my brain that controls regulation doesn’t work properly. That’s why I need your help to regulate.
  12. Don’t try to break me of things that you see as weaknesses. My sensitivity as a child means I’ll be compassionate as an adult. My stubbornness as a child means I’ll be independent and assertive as an adult. Instead of squashing these characteristics, channel them toward something good that can benefit me when I’m older. Don’t view me as something that needs fixed or toughened up.
  13. Don’t be afraid of labeling me. A label gives me answers and help. If my condition is serious enough to need to be diagnosed, you can guarantee that I’ve noticed something’s wrong and I’m wondering why I’m different too. Unless you tell me what’s going on, I’m likely to grow up angry and confused about why everyone has it all together and I don’t. A label means I can get help, it gives me answers and vindication.
  14. I have a real, actual medical condition in my brain. It’s just as real as if I had Type 1 Diabetes. Just like Diabetes, I need help to deal with the condition. No one tells someone with Type 1 Diabetes that they are lazy if they’re tired because their blood sugar is low. They understand that it’s part of the condition.
  15. Please, please, please learn about my condition, and don’t blame me for things that are out of my control. Just like leaving Type 1 Diabetes untreated results in serious complications and even death, untreated ADHD can lead to serious complications – potentially including death. Thankfully, there are many ways to treat ADHD (and medication isn’t the only way but a sure way to help me).
  16. My frontal lobe is developing 30% behind normal. Please understand this and don’t put me in situations I’m not ready to handle. If you give me responsibility that’s beyond my developmental age, don’t be angry with me that I do poorly. That’s setting me up for failure, and that’s just cruel.
  17. Stop expecting me to be normal. I can’t be. Not for all my trying. Until you accept that, I’ll always be a failure in your eyes, and I’ll always view myself as not good enough.
  18. You have the power to make me miserable by how you treat me. Remember to treat me with love and grace. Treat me how you would want to be treated if you were struggling with a problem in your brain. I may make myself miserable sometimes, but don’t add to that by treating me poorly. When in doubt, be kind. Believe me, I need your kindness, love, support, time and validation.

 

 

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There are THOUSANDS of different languages and dialects in India alone. Embedded in each one, like a skeleton, is our common inventory of things we need to discuss. In a shared language we conduct our business with a speed and dexterity that is only possible when we can take meanings for granted. Without a shared language, the conversation becomes like archeology, we painstakingly dig out meanings from our common inventories of human stuff and clarify them with pointing and miming. It can be exhausting and still leave us with ambiguous, tentative conclusions.

In that situation, we have a minimal, shared global language for taking care of existential business without words. Like dogs and cats, we have symbolic body language communicating all sorts of things about how we feel. There are global facial expressions, gestures and vocal tones indicating things like I am harmless, friendly, afraid, confused, sick, etc. These are universal enough that we can read each other pretty easily about simple things without a spoken language in common. * Continue reading

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I made this lake out of a composite of 12 different photos, then digitally painted and shaded it into something approaching realism…It’s all awkward knees and elbows as an image

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